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SNAP (Food Stamp) Special Rules for Elderly People or People With Disabilities

Most Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamp Program) rules apply to all households, but there are a few special rules for households that contain an elderly or disabled member.

Who Is Elderly?

A person is elderly if he or she is 60 years of age or older.

Who Is Disabled?

Generally, a person is considered to be disabled for SNAP purposes if he or she:

           Receives Federal disability or blindness payments under the Social Security Act, including Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security disability or blindness payments; or

           Receives State disability or blindness payments based on SSI rules; or

           Receives a disability retirement benefit from a governmental agency because of a disability considered permanent under the Social Security Act; or

           Receives an annuity under the Railroad Retirement Act and is eligible for Medicare or is considered to be disabled based on the SSI rules; or

           Is a veteran who is totally disabled, permanently housebound, or in need of regular aid and attendance; or

           Is a surviving spouse or child of a veteran who is receiving VA benefits and is considered to be permanently disabled.

How Do I Get SNAP (Food Stamps)?

A member of your household has to apply at the local SNAP office. It should be listed in the government section of the local telephone book. This is generally the quickest way to find the local SNAP office. If that doesn't work, try calling the SNAP (Food Stamp Hotline).

If you are unable to go to the SNAP office, you may have another person, called an authorized representative, apply and be interviewed on your behalf. You must designate the authorized representative in writing.

Normally a household must file an application form, have a face-to-face interview, and provide proof (verification) of certain information, such as income and expenses. The office interview may be waived if the household is unable to appoint an authorized representative and no household member is able to go to the SNAP office because of age or disability. If the office interview is waived, the SNAP office will interview you by telephone or do a home visit. A home visit must be scheduled beforehand with the household.

What Is A Household?

Everyone who lives together and purchases and prepares meals together is grouped together as one household. However, if a person is 60 years of age or older and he or she is unable to purchase and prepare meals separately because of a permanent disability, the person and the person's spouse may be a separate household if the others they live with do not have very much income. (Less than 165 percent of the poverty level.)

Some people who live together, such as husbands and wives and most children under age 22, are included in the same household, even if they purchase and prepare meals separately.

Normally people are not eligible for SNAP benefits if an institution gives them their meals. However, there is one exception for elderly persons and one for disabled persons:

           Residents of federally subsidized housing for the elderly may be eligible for SNAP, even though they receive their meals at the facility.

           Disabled persons who live in certain nonprofit group living arrangements (small group homes with no more than 16 residents) may be eligible for SNAP, even though the group home prepares their meals for them.

See the topic Household Composition - SNAP (Food Stamps) for additional information about determining who is included (or excluded) in the household.

What Resources Can I Have (And Still Get SNAP [Food Stamps])?

A household with an elderly or disabled (effective FY 2003) member may have up to $3,000 in resources. A household without an elderly or disabled person may have up to $2000 in resources. Some resources are not counted, such as your home and lot and up to $4,650 of the fair market value of one car. If a vehicle is needed to transport a physically disabled household member, its value is not counted. The resources of people who get SSI and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) are not counted at all. See the Food Stamp Resource Tests topic for more information.

What Are The Income Limits?

Most households have to meet both a monthly gross income test and a monthly net income test to be eligible for SNAP benefits. However, households in which all members are receiving SSI or TANF are considered to be eligible based on income. Other households with one or more elderly members only have to meet the net income test. The net income test is gross income minus certain deductions.

What Deductions Are Allowed?

The allowable deductions are: a standard deduction for all households; a 20% earned income deduction; a deduction for dependent care costs when necessary for work, training, or education; a deduction for legally owed child support payments; a deduction for medical costs for elderly and disabled people; and an excess shelter cost deduction.

Medical deduction. For elderly members, allowable medical costs that are more than $35 a month may be deducted unless an insurance company or someone who is not a household member pays for them. Only the amount over $35 each month may be deducted. Allowable costs include most medical and dental expenses, such as doctor bills, prescription drugs and other over-the-counter medication when approved by a doctor, dentures, inpatient and outpatient hospital expenses, and nursing care. They also include other medically related expenses, such as certain transportation costs, attendant care, and health insurance premiums. The costs of special diets are not allowable medical costs. Proof of medical expenses and insurance payments is required before a deduction for these expenses may be allowed.

Shelter deduction. The shelter deduction is for shelter costs that are more than half of the household's income after other deductions. Allowable shelter costs include the costs of rent or mortgage, taxes, interest, and utilities such as gas, electricity, and water. For most households, there is a limit on the amount of the deduction that can be allowed, but for a household with an elderly or disabled member all shelter costs over half of the household's income may be deducted.

Receiving SNAP (Food Stamps):

States issue SNAP benefits through local State or county offices to households that are eligible to receive them. Traditionally, they issued paper food stamps, but now, States issue SNAP benefits through Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT). The SNAP office gives the household a plastic electronic card. The household pays for its groceries at authorized food stores (almost all food stores are authorized) by using the card at the checkout counter. It works like the bank debit card that other people use to pay for their groceries in increasing numbers of stores. The cost of the groceries bought is deducted from the household's account automatically. A major advantage of this method is that the use of SNAP benefits is not conspicuous. Most other people in line will not notice that the person checking out is paying with SNAP benefits. SNAP households like this feature, because it reduces the stigma many people feel in using SNAP.

A second advantage is that the household no longer needs to go anywhere to pick up benefits each month. Benefits are automatically loaded into the household's account each month on the designated date. Many households especially enjoy this feature.

Nondiscrimination:

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital and family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Further Information:

Contact your local SNAP office for further information, or to file an application for food stamps.

See the following topics for additional information:

            SNAP (Food Stamp Program) - Overview

            SNAP (Food Stamp) Benefit Levels

            SNAP (Food Stamp) Resource Tests

            SNAP (Food Stamp) Income Tests

            SNAP (Food Stamp) Sample Calculations

            SNAP (Food Stamp) State Information/Hotline Numbers


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